Inclusive Book Recommendations




Looking for more inclusive books for your child? Here are just a few recommendations that promote disability awareness and acceptance, inclusivity, and cultural education!


Quick tips on how to choose inclusive books:

  • Look at the author. Authors with first-hand knowledge about their book provide the most inclusive stories.

  • Look at the illustrations. Your child should be able to recognize the characters in their book from what they see in the real world.

  • Look for stereotypes or common misconceptions hidden in the writing or illustrations.

  • Look for all characters being treated as equals. Inclusive books blend all different types of characters.


1. This Beach is Loud! by Samantha Cotterill

“Going to the beach is exciting. But it can also be busy. And loud. Sand can feel hot or itchy or sticky...and it gets everywhere! In This Beach Is Loud!, a sensitive boy gets overwhelmed by all the sights, sounds, and sensations at the beach. Luckily, this kiddo's dad has a trick up his sleeve to help his son face these unexpected obstacles.”


This book includes:

Inclusive illustrations

Sensory obstacles

Supportive family relationships

Knowledgeable author


Great for:

Children with autism

Children with sensory troubles


2. The Proudest Blue by Ibtihaj Muhammad

“With her new backpack and light-up shoes, Faizah knows the first day of school is going to be special. It's the start of a brand new year and, best of all, it's her older sister Asiya's first day of hijab--a hijab of beautiful blue fabric, like the ocean waving to the sky. But not everyone sees hijab as beautiful, and in the face of hurtful, confusing words, Faizah will find new ways to be strong.”


This book includes:

Inclusive illustrations

Supportive family relationships

Knowledgeable author

Tier II words


Great for:

Conversations about acceptance

Conversations about bullying


3. Lone Wolf by Sarah Kurpiel

“Maple the husky is a valued member of the team, but strangers always seem to think she’s a wolf! It’s true: Maple can hunt, she can howl, and she can dig, just like wolves can. Oh, no! What if she is a wolf and doesn’t belong with her family after all?”


This book includes:

Inclusive illustrations

Wheelchair representation

Family relationships


Great for:

Teaching individuality and belonging


4. Thank You, Omu! by Oge Mora

“Everyone in the neighborhood dreams of a taste of Omu's delicious stew! One by one, they follow their noses toward the scrumptious scent. And one by one, Omu offers a portion of her meal. Soon the pot is empty. Has she been so generous that she has nothing left for herself?”


This book includes:

Family relationships

Inclusive illustrations


Great for:

Conversations about sharing and benevolence

Learning about a different culture

Learning about different occupations


5. Moses Goes to a Concert by Isaac Millman

“Moses and his school friends are deaf, but like most children, they have a lot to say. They communicate in American Sigh Language, using visual signs and facial expressions. This is called signing. And even though they can't hear, they can enjoy many activities through their other senses. Today, Moses and his classmates are going to a concert. Their teacher, Mr. Samuels, has two surprises in store for them, to make this particular concert a special event.”


This book includes:

Deaf representation

ASL guides at the bottom of each page


Great for:

Introducing child to deaf community

Learning ASL


6. It’s Okay to Ask! by Gillette Children’s Specialty Healthcare

“Have you ever been curious about someone who is different from you? It’s Okay to Ask! introduces five children who have disabilities or complex medical conditions. They love to read, play, tell jokes, and make friends. As you get to know the characters in the book and learn that it’s okay to ask questions, you will discover that everyone is more alike than you might think and that people of all abilities can be friends.”


This book includes:

Disability representation

Inclusive illustrations


Great for:

Education on different disabilities

Teaching children to observe similarities, not just differences


7. The Boy with Big, Big Feelings by Britney Winn Lee

“Meet a boy with feelings so big that they glow from his cheeks, spill out of his eyes, and jump up and down on his chest.”


This book includes:

Great illustrated representations of overstimulation

Positive representation of emotions


Great for:

Kids with autism/children with big emotions


8. When Oliver Speaks by Kimberly Garvin and Saadiq Wicks

“A heartfelt story about a young boy who struggles to overcome his stutter while finding the courage to accept it.”


This book includes:

Knowledgeable author

Stuttering

Family Relationships


Great for:

Confidence building




Additional books:

Diverse Books

Books Including Disabilities



 

Gracie Lee is a rising Junior at the University of Alabama studying Communicative Disorders with a minor in Business. She plans to become a Speech-Language Pathologist and specialize in aural rehabilitation. In her spare time, Gracie likes to read, bake, and go to concerts with her friends.

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